Blog

Posts Tagged ‘walk out walk on’

All change is local. This time, I mean it.

by Deborah Frieze January 20, 2014

Are you familiar with runes? I was first introduced to these ancient Norse divination stones by Meg Wheatley when she told me that Berkana, the name of the institute she founded, was the rune for growth and rebirth. Ever since, I’ve cast a single rune each January 1st to give me a clue about the year to come. This year I drew Jera which means harvest and fruition, a time of reaping rewards from seeds sown long ago.

Read More »

Share
Triggering positive changes

by Community Blog November 5, 2013

Author: Haikaa Yamamoto

My name is Haikaa, I am a multicultural singer-songwriter and author and I am absolutely passionate about empowering people. So many of the problems in our world that bother me either arise from or feed on disempowerment. As an artist, my music centers around themes such as self-acceptance, assertiveness, love and surrender.

Read More »

Share
Life and Death Outside My Bedroom Window

by Deborah Frieze July 24, 2013

Every morning I wake up and watch life and death outside my bedroom window. We have two beehives perched on the roof of a first floor sunroom. As I watch the hive come alive with the morning sun, most of the bees begin their very full workday, zipping in and out, hovering as they await return entry. But a few of the bees have a different task: Their job is to pull the dead and dying out of the hive and deposit them on the roof, where some lay lifeless and others tremble with their last breaths.

Read More »

Share
Walking Out of the Gallery Scene

by Community Blog June 11, 2013

Author: Sarah Zoutewelle-Morris

Dear people,

I would like to tell an inspiring story, but I find myself in the uncomfortable in-between state of having walked out of the old, and not yet having hit solid ground in the new. And perhaps this story needs to be told as well for others who are in a similar position.

Read More »

Share
Living the Gift

by Filiz Telek May 15, 2013

Even 
After
All this time
The Sun never says to the Earth,
“You owe me.”


Look
What happens
With a love like that,
It lights the whole sky.

– Hafiz

Five of us have been in a passionate conversation for over a year now about gift consciousness and how it is manifesting in our world right now. We are Manish Jain from Shikshantar, India; Filiz Telek and Ayşegül Güzel from Zumbara, Turkey; Lina Cramer and Richard Durning from Wisdom Exchange, USA. As a result of this ongoing dialogue, GIFTIVAL was born! We are sensing that it is a crucial time to bring together visionaries and practitioners of the Gift in a peer-to-peer, playful, collective inquiry to share our ideas, experiments, practices and burning questions. We envision activating our collective intelligence & heart by being in this inquiry and celebration together.

Read More »

Share
Leaving Utopia: A Glimpse of How the World Could Be

by Deborah Frieze April 16, 2013

A little over a year ago, I made my first visit to Järna, Sweden, home of the Youth Initiative Program (YIP), a one-year social entrepreneur learning program for 18-25 year olds. As I was preparing to depart, one of the YIPpies stopped by my room to ask me how I felt about my visit. It was then that I spoke the lyrics to what would become the first song I ever wrote when I said, “I feel like I’m packing to leave utopia.”

Read More »

Share
Restoring the flow of abundance at Kufunda

by Deborah Frieze January 17, 2013

Last week, I spent a few days at Kufunda Learning Village in Zimbabwe. Here are just a few of the many activities that were going on:

In the herb lab, Patricia and Enock are blending tincture of Artemisia with lemon juice and raw honey to help a neighbor who is suffering from chronic asthma. They will provide a month’s supply of this remedy for free. Patricia dreams of opening an herbal clinic in town where she would work four days a week so she could spend the fifth at the Kufunda clinic and keep it free.

Read More »

Share
More Evidence That We Walk Outs Need Each Other

by Deborah Frieze August 23, 2012

Last week, I participated in my first Tweet Chat. This was a four-hour, pre-arranged Twitter session using the hashtag #wowochat to link tweets together in a virtual conversation. Fellow Walk Out Walk On-er Aerin Dunford and I decided to co-host an inquiry among Walk Outs involved in learning and education. Our invitation was this:

Many educators unsatisfied with our current school systems are walking out of institutions and limiting beliefs about what’s possible. These brave folks are walking on to create new learning spaces outside of formal educational infrastructure; to challenge attachment to grades, diplomas and degrees; and to convene breakthrough conversations.

During this Tweet Chat, we’ll explore questions like:

  • What has compelled you to walk out of mainstream education?
  • How do you integrate your fears as you step into the unknown?
  • What are you called to walk on to now in your life?
  • Is it possible to create the new without engaging dominant institutions?

 

Read More »

Share
Walking On to Localism

by Deborah Frieze July 9, 2012

I am starting a new project. It is another learning journey, one that I’ve been poking around the edges of for a few years now. This time, I’ll be exploring the U.S. and Canada, instead of the Global South. But it’s still about Walk Outs who Walk On.

Let me start with a preview and explain the rest after. Here is a photo-film that I created with my dear friend and colleague, photographer Dan Séguin. The narrator is Paul Saginaw, the iconoclastic co-founder of Zingerman’s, a popular deli and community of food-related businesses in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Read More »

Share
Flexing Our Muscles of Discernment

by Deborah Frieze April 25, 2012

It’s been one year and two weeks since Walk Out Walk On was launched into the world.  I just returned home from Denver and Boulder, Colorado, the final two stops on the book tour, and now is a good time to reflect on what I’ve learned over these last twelve months. And here it is:

The United States has lost its sense of subtlety.

Read More »

Share